The winter Palace
The winter Palace was built for Empress Elisabeth on the project of Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli in 1754-1762 years and until 1917 it remained the main Imperial residence. This fourth stone…

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The St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague
The St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague — six centuries of work were not in vain, Leaving spires of Prague, in the sky, grandiose and mystically beautiful, mysterious and geometrically perfect,…

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Gothic architecture

Gothic art was born about 1440, in the Ile-de-France.

Initially, it is observed only in the construction of the most important cathedrals and Abbey churches of this area. But pretty soon the Gothic style spread throughout France and then throughout Europe. Not limited to sacred architecture, the master of Gothic actively distributed new style to the area of secular construction. Gothic is the first in the history of architectural style, which are still preserved works in all genres. Among these outstanding buildings occupy a special place are extremely diverse in stylistic terms, the cathedrals, the Abbey and the town’s Church. They are richly adorned with sculpture, stained glass and wall paintings and decoration occupy a prominent place in the works of jewelry art and sumptuously illustrated books. Along with the Gothic churches of modern audiences still continue to fascinate a variety of city buildings, castles and palaces, decorated no less elaborately than the masterpieces of religious architecture. Continue reading

The Architecture Of Ancient Greece

The concept of “ancient art” first appeared in the XV century in Italy, when in combat with thousands of years of Church tradition of the middle ages argued new, is permeated with faith in the beauty and value of human culture of the Renaissance.

Its creators turned to the wonderful creations of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. This great civilization of the ancient world they called the ancient (from the Latin word “antiquus” – “ancient”). Subsequently, the term “antique art” firmly entrenched in European culture.

Masterpieces, created by talented masters of the ancient world, for several centuries inspired poets, composers, playwrights and artists all over Europe, and today continues to give us artistic pleasure and to serve as a norm and unattainable model. Continue reading

Gothic cathedrals of France

The name “Gothic art” (from Italian. gotico — “Gothic”, the name of a Germanic tribe is ready) emerged in the Renaissance. “Gothic” in those days meant “barbarian” in contrast to “Roman”: the Gothic was called art that did not follow the ancient traditions, and therefore, had no interest for his contemporaries. This view had changed only in the XIX century when the middle Ages was no longer considered the “dark ages” in the history of mankind. However, the name “Gothic” was preserved for the European art of the late middle Ages. In various European countries, the Gothic style had its own characteristics and time frame, but it flourished in the XIII—XIV centuries In the history of art, it is customary to distinguish early, Mature (high) and late (“flamboyant”) Gothic

Gothic developed in countries dominated by the Catholic Church, and under the auspices of the feudal and ecclesiastical foundations remained in the ideology and culture of the Gothic era. Goticheskaya remained a predominantly cultic in purpose and religious topics: it was correlated with eternity, with “higher” irrational forces. Continue reading